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been brought about by technology and the new fuel efficiency standards that were enacted by the bush administration and were increased by the obama administration. the report is not political in any way shape or form. it endorses things that are supported by the right in some cases and that are supported by people on the left. you cannot just take the parts that you like. you have to take the holistic approach, to maximize u.s. production and to reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. the last thing i will say is that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. 70% of our use of petroleum in this country is for transportation. transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. if you want to reduce the united states' dependence on imported petroleum and the related geopolitical issues, particularly in an issue when rising demand is creating a potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum or the prices are set on the wo
. the clerk: h.r. 6582, a bill to allow for innovations and alternative technologies that meet or exceed desired energy efficiency goals and to make technical corrections to existing federal energy efficiency laws, to allow american manufacturers to remain competitive. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. which the field, and the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, each will control 20 minutes. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from kentucky. mr. whitfield: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material in the record and i would like to include several letters including the energy and commerce committee's exchange of letters with the science, space and technology committee and the transportation and infrastructure committee. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. whitfield: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. whitfield: i rise to
they would take their own proceeds and reinvested back into their technology, like a business can do, and the fha is restricted. i had to go to congress and ask them to draft a bill and get legislation to allow us to raise premiums to protect our risk. that is the proposition for success over the long term. that is where the debate should be. how do we make this realization most effective, with best deals, best credit risk, so they can support the system and a little less about let's continue to pull the support out from under them? >> can you do that, because if you can, then the things you talked about are true. but if there are limits to what legislation does or does not do, and doesn't that raise questions over all these other things? a lot of the loss mitigation of the administration has been trying to encourage the private sector what they are limited to do on their own book. if you are making low downpayment loans and think principal reduction is the right way to deal with underwater borrowers, that is where i am going, is that achievable what you are talking about? >> i say w
technology, all of the great capability and genius of the american people we know we can reduce these costs. the fairness argument is, is it fair to always lead with reducing it on the backs of the beneficiaries as opposed to what the root problem is of the cost and the expense? yes, sir. >> there's been a lot of talk about reducing tax loopholes. stepping aside from the debate whether or not there should be deductions or tax breaks, how do democrats feel about the mortgage interest tax deduction and whether or not that should be talked about or raise revenues by reducing the mortgage interest rate? >> when you look at everything in a comprehensive manner, and in the total aspects of tax reform in general, everything should be included on the table. s having said that, this is the backbone of the -- one of the back bones of the middle class. and clearly we support and feel very strongly about sustaining the middle class who use that mortgage deduction and mortgage buildup to for the most part pay for college education as well. >> so you feel that dealing with the mortgage interest deduction
ground on technology is going to win both warfare and politics and we can't allow that to happen again. one lesson is you want to make sure from a perspective you are communicating your message to people and ensuring not only they are supporters but also voters. >> how do you regain the technological high ground? >> investing in it. it's there and can be done. the technology of 2012 was amazing and 2016 is indescribable. has to be invested in and priority. the chairman inherited a party that had financial problems and got the party out of a financial hole which didn't create a lot of time and space. part of what we need to do. you need to have a marketing department but you need to have a good production department. you need to have good policy that you are selling and state of the art methods. >> you personally tweet? >> i try to. but no one has ever sent a tweet on my behalf. i control my own twitter feed because it is authentic and it is about hip-hop and sports. >> you are a dolphins guy? >> yeah. they got beat last sunday. >> what devices do you carry? >> iphone. i didn't know if
in oil and gas production as well. people talk about the technology and access on private lands. but if we did not have $12 gas and $85 oil, do not see the development -- you would not see development of unconventional is. -- unconventionals. host: robert from st. louis, missouri. caller: thank you for having me. i agree with the previous caller, who had some question as to whether we get complete information. i share that. i was wondering but specifically, brazil has converted pretty much to ethanol. i wonder whether government was responsible for that. i wonder why we have not made much stuff there. is clean coal in it? i've heard that it is. -- a muyth? yth? --a myth? i have heard that it is. why don't we have a push for household and commercial utilities to primarily use natural gas equipment, like water heaters, home heating, so one instead of having to generate electricity with other fuels? cote fracking, i've seen a documentary that showed people turning on their water faucets and they could actually like them. yet it seems to be -- light them. yet it seems to be sweepin
, firing it into your or israel, and ultimately getting a icbm technology, being able to reach the united states? this is a classic paradigm. wmd terrorism. what are the real risks of wmd terrorism and throw their significant risks. -- terrorism? >> there are significant risks. when you look at chemical and biological, they're also very significant threats there. when you look what happened in world war ii, the japanese army dropped infected fleas in china and killed 50,000 people as a biotech. played infected fleas killed 50,000 people -- plague-infected fleas killed 50,000 people. you have terrorist groups in the middle east. al-qaeda has tried very hard for years to develop wmd. probably the closest they came was when there were a group of retired pakistan the leaders -- pakistani leaders to try to team up with al-qaeda to help them develop a wmd. luckily they were tracked down upon before things got too far out of hand. that is an example of al qaeda. you have to worry potentially about iranian scientists teaming any similar way. you look at hezbollah, there are rumors that hezbollah
substations like senator lieberman's near the water, nor did they invest in smart grid technology that i a lous you to use computers and sensors to respond to outages, learn where the damage is and communicate with customer. the lack of investment, leadership and foresightly lifa is costing us big time. it doesn't give me pleasure to report to this committee that they'll be submitting an stiment $400 billion -- an estimated $800 million bill to fema. it would be foolish to give them $800 million without making them update. so i've asked to include a significant rate stabilization and mitigation plan into any reimbursement they issue to lifa. it's imperative that this process start now with the full cooperation of the federal government. it's my understanding that this week, new york state began discussing with fema a system wide mitigation proposal where the authority would submit a large plan to harden the system as opposed to individual work sheets and i would encourage the committee to work with us on this. just one more point on subways, sandy decimated the new york -- the new york c
young career. for example, he's played an active role in introducing new technology to both students and staff, has worked to develop 21st century learning skills in a classroom environment that fosters creativity, innovation and critical thinking. most importantly, ryan works tirelessly to help his students achieve success in the classroom. ryan devlin, thank you for your commitment to the teaching profession and congratulations. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute, mr. speaker, and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, members, as announced earlier by congressman ralph hall, we lost a member of the texas legislature, congressman jack brooks, who proudly served his southeast texas district for 42 years after he was first elected in 1952. mr. green: ultimatelying as dean in this house of representatives and dean of our texas delegation. i knew jack br
care issue as well, we talked about technology, data sharing, there's a lot of productivity issues embedded in this. >> we have a couple of minutes left, a couple other hot button topics we haven't discussed as much. capital gains and dividends. dividends treated as ordinary income, capital gains up to 20%. how much revenue are we talking about there? and if those become bargaining chips how much are we giving up? >> the cap gains rate is scheduled to go to 20%. but we're actually talking 23.8%. dividends currently at 15%, scheduled to go to ordinary rates, and add the 3.8% as well for people who have high enough incomes. significant increases. interesting fact as you think about the fiscal cliff and what's coming, you see people responding to it in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up dividends into this year to help vare shareholders take advantage of the lower rate. you see and i expect you'll see more investors realizing capital gains to get lower rate this is year. there's clearly money there and there's clearly money that has if you will,
they say, well, our property, our cars, our technology wears out faster. guest: the current law is not correct. and this has to do with the retailers and the restaurants. their provision is that they get to deduct their property over 15 years instead of over 39 years. and they say, you know, 39 years is unrealistic and 15 years is more on money. host: how long you have been writing about taxes? guest: i've been write being taxes for maybe five years. host: how much do you think you know about the u.s. tax code? guest: not so much. i mean, like, i talk to tax experts, people with law degrees. and they probably know a lot about one part of the tax code. so, there are only like a few people i know who just have an encyclopedic knowledge about the entire thing who could say, in section 140-c-34 -- so those are very few and far between. i know more than many people. host: if somebody sat you down and said, write a book about the u.s. tax code -- guest: i could probably write about it in a more entertaining way. that's why i'm here to sort of bridge the gap between the tax nerds who k
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11